Quote Christie: the most wonderful music in the world

After listening to the Poppea radio broadcast, some things clarified.

(What a serious distractions visuals can be…)

Christie is going real old school – not (never, with this rep) a criticism, just an observation. For the past week I’ve been listening to Jacobs (Paris, 2004) and Egarr (Enescu Festival, 2015). Whilst each of the three does interesting things – and we can thank Monteverdi for leaving so much up to interpretation! – Christie is, strangely, in this context, the most dramatic. I’m talking especially about Addio, Roma – really good tension on the monochord theorbo (I think) that sets Ottavia’s heartbroken goodbye – and Nerone’s meltdown – mayhem! 😀

And, strangely again, whilst the background is so old school, we have non-Baroque specialists, who – especially Yoncheva – bring a very different feel to it. I think we’re past puritanical obsessions and can appreciate a bit of a mix.  It’s heartwarming to see non-specialists insist on having roles like these in their repertoire. It surely brings them to the attention of the general public.

Strictly technically speaking, Alder is at this point my favourite Poppea, and I would love to see her in a staged production (sooner rather than later), paired up with a mezzo who won’t be drowned – or with a conductor who can direct her well.

However, Yoncheva has a very nice range for this role, with some warm and almost dark plunges into the lows, whilst Alder stays within a brighter timbre. When she’s not rushed, Yoncheva can produce pleasant trills. And it’s really lovely hearing her sing along Lindsey.

The more I listen, the more I’m impressed with Lindsey’s performance as Nerone. That meltdown is something else! But even better (and stylish) are her trills, which I had not rated particularly high in the past (re: Sesto in Paris against Gauvin’s Vitellia). We’ve also got range, from a handsomely vigorous dark mezzo to those goofy “wicked Nerone” higher pitched incursions. I think it’s also a rep in which she doesn’t have to force at all (tempo included), so more colours and possibilities open. I would be very happy if she explores more of the same.

Comparing the three, I would say Jacobs makes it the most hip-sounding (bot not necessary HIP), Egarr’s is cembalo-driven and Christie brings out some startling details. It’s how I remember his Cesare – he plays with this music; it’s not about playing it correctly – because it’s not hard to do so – but it’s about having fun with it. The above mentioned theorbo and the cornetti (where others didn’t seem to have used them), as well as the ensemble at the end of Act III really stand out.

It’s interesting that he mentions Harnoncourt starting off HIP then moving on, because I would say this is more or less what he’s doing here, collarborating with non-specialist singers. You get to a level like Salzburg, so what are you going to do? Salzburg wants “cool” but also it wants its big stars who will draw the posh crowds. But that’s not a bad thing, like I said. The more posh audiences get used to small kvlt bands playing 17th century operas and big stars joining enhusiastically, the better. We shouldn’t keep Monteverdi to ourselves, the whole world deserves to know and learn to appreaciate these wonderful operas.

Poppea is such a great achievement because it’s basically a lossely sung play. In that way it’s very modern, but those loosely sung parts are more alluring than similar later efforts. I always marvel how he causes language to purr without modifying its cadence at all. It makes me think we should all sing to each other instead of simpy talking and find our own languages’ inner music.

Also mad props to Busenello for such a tight libretto (another reason why you should employ an actual poet instead of writing it yourself). Every character has a distinctive voice and then there are the simply rendered but keenly observed interactions between people. This is the kind of music where a slightly modified inflection makes all the difference. After listening to Monteverdi I invariably say to myself “Were I a singer, I would want to sing this all the time.” And if I were musically inclined, I have no doubt this it the kind of thing that would’ve made me decide on pursuing even an “amateur career” in singing.

Now that I re-listened, I’m still firm in my opinion that Vistoli has a way to go before he gets on a level with Iestyn Davies as far as Ottone is concerned. Having spent a few days revisiting Davies’ Ottone, I can say without issues that he is my favourite countertenor Ottone. I used to like his Glyndebourne E pur io torno qui a lot, but he actually improved for the Enescu Festival. That aria and his performance in general in that concert is very possibly my favourite from a countertenor ever, I am surprised to say. It’s just flawless, stylish and perfectly pitched emotionally. I’ve seen him many times but that is it for me. I should put it on YT, I don’t think it’s up for our enjoymentit is! It occurs to me that I have actually seen him sing Ottone back in 2014, but I guess I didn’t know any better… I wish I could see him now.

However, after this perhaps unflattering detour and unusual Davies worship, Vistoli’s tone is easily recognisable and very likable. He’s quite mezzo-ish, bypassing the all too common bleat of many countertenors. I can see why Christie picked him and it could be interesting to see how he develops.

When speaking about “the darkness of Baroque”, Lauwers seemed quite interested in the character of Seneca as the moral compass of the opera. He said he would like an older singer, with possibly a ruined voice for this role (Visse was waving from the side, trying to get his attention 😉 ) but I suppose Christie called up a very young bass-baritone who (intelligence says) appeared worried how he’d come off. Well, given the low set technical bar, he needn’t have worried. Kidding, he was fine. Who cares about Seneca, anyway, beside as a butt of jokes? But I guess Lauwers doesn’t quite get what a “gone” voice sounds like; it’s often the darkness that’s gone, and without darkness you’re not going to have Seneca centre the opera. It’s all good, because this production is hardly centred.

About dehggial

Mozart/Baroque loving red dragon

Posted on August 19, 2018, in baroque, italian opera, live performances, mezzos & contraltos, sopranos and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 31 Comments.

  1. it’ll be interesting to see exactly how distracting the visuals are, it seems rather on the extreme end from all the pictures. having said that the vast bulk of day to day opera consumption around the world would be aural only, so what would be the relative importance of visuals overall, in opera? something to ponder..

    i am extremely happy with what i’ve heard of KL as Nerone so far, i hope she does a few more! i have a theory that she’s been more open to exploring range and variation in tone since her Thousands of Miles CD.

    • it’s quite extreme. I suppose opera houses might feel a bit insecure about early works which rely so much on text and possibly try hard to make them visually “exciting”.

      i am extremely happy with what i’ve heard of KL as Nerone so far, i hope she does a few more!

      I hope so, too! She could even revisit it at Glyndebourne, if they ever bring the production back. Also, a Poppea is due for ROH cca 2020, as per their “once every two years” Monteverdi projects. But, regardless of where, I hope she keeps it in her rep.

  2. The trailer sure looks distracting! For me, the beauty of Poppea is in its simplicity, how it works so well without elaborate sets, costumes or large orchestra. But I’m trying to stay open-minded… (and looking forward to those hot scenes…)

    • agreed on simplicity but also on the hot scenes 😉 it’s so interesting, after hearing much more elaborate operas written later, how Monteverdi’s work still retains its musical power.

  3. Only made it 30 minutes or so into the broadcast, but now I first had to head over to the Enescu version and check out Davis’ Ottone again (I just so love Eppur io torno in general). You’re right, this is a very skilled and touching version. Vistoli seemed a bit tense of nervous to me. Might be fitting for the situation in the story, but still not very pleasant for listening…
    About Christie, my first impression is that of a mildly chaotic interpretation, a sort of very skillful imprecision, that nevertheless makes total sense. Definitely different from versions of other conductors, but I guess that’s the charm of the freedom Monteverdi leaves for interpretation. Looking forward to listen more, I’m just so busy at the moment I don’t find much time.

  4. …rereading this know and going “yes, yes, yes, also know I get what you meant”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s