A slice of Lucy Crowe (Wigmore Hall, 4 May 2018)

After a not-quite meeting of minds on the local live scene, I discovered Lucy Crowe in last year’s Madrid Rodelinda, which you may remember as an unusually tender affair from Guth with some formidable singing from the top trio Crowe-Mehta-Prina. Things followed the same exciting path a couple of months later live, with ROH’s resuscitation of their long dormant Mitridate and here we are in 2018.

What the first part of the recital solidifies for me is that Crowe’s voice is best suited to Early-ish mezzoforte to pp detail work rather than sustatined drama shaped by drastic volume gear changes. She’s at a point in her career where she can fire the jets if needs be, but the result, at least to my ears, is acidic and opaque (claustrophobic)1 – nowhere near a challenge for someone whose top volume revels in dramatic colouring like, say, Roschmann.

When she tries something like Wolf’s Philine, on the other hand, it’s a revelation to whoever has not experienced her Handel and early Mozart (like I imagine the chap behind me, who, before the show made some of the most refreshing comments I’ve overheard at Wiggy). Her voice sparkles, full of life and kinetic and she handles the text with the right amount of impishness.

Sadly I can’t comment on the second part of the show, as I had to leave early for an unshakable night shift. I do, however, want to comment on the term “female” when used to describe women in converstation as opposed to in biology books. I hate it. It sounds like how a serial killer would itemize its bludgeoned victims rather than a thoughtful man’s musings on what he makes of women’s experience – as I suppose it’s intended here.

On the other hand, a programme of women’s portraits done by men yet sung and played by women is still a good idea. But I would’ve needed to stay until the end to get a real idea of how this mirrored reinterpretation works out.

Female Portraits

Lucy Crowe soprano
Anna Tilbrook piano

Henry Purcell (c.1659-1695)
Bess of Bedlam Z370

Franz Schubert (1797-1828)
An Silvia D891
Gretchen am Spinnrade D118
Marie D658
Suleika I D720

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
Ach, um deine feuchten Schwingen Op. 34 No. 4

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Lieder und Gesänge aus Wilhelm Meister Op. 98a
No. 1 Kennst du das Land?
Myrthen Op. 25
Lied der Suleika

Hugo Wolf (1860-1903)
Goethe Lieder
Philine

Richard Strauss (1864-1949)
Drei Lieder der Ophelia Op. 67
Cäcilie Op. 27 No. 2

Interval

Reynaldo Hahn (1874-1947)
A Chloris

Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)
Lydia Op. 4 No. 2
Sylvie Op. 6 No. 3
Nell Op. 18 No. 1

Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
Jane

Henri Duparc (1848-1933)
Phidylé

Émile Paladilhe (1844-1926)
Psyché

William Walton (1902-1983)
Daphne
Beatriz’s Song

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
Sweet Polly Oliver

Hoagy Carmichael (1899-1981)
Georgia on my Mind

Cole Porter (1891-1964)
Miss Otis regrets


  1. Though it’s true it freed up quite a bit by the end of ther period. 
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About dehggial

Mozart/Baroque loving red dragon

Posted on May 5, 2018, in live performances, sopranos, wigmore hall and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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