David Daniels the sponge (Wigmore Hall, 20 March 2017)

When Wiggy posted their upcoming season we (Team London) looked curiously at this date. He’s singing what? I wanted to see DD because I really like his Furibondo spira il vento tone so if he was singing Beethoven so be it.

It all started with Daniels apologising for obliterating his bowtie due to stage jitters. Perhaps if he waltzed in without mentioning it no one would’ve been the wiser (though what do I know, I’m all for casual chic and for moving swiftly on) but after that I’m sure we all focused on his collar. It was kinda cute.

David Daniels countertenor
Martin Katz piano

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Adelaide Op. 46

Henry Purcell (c.1659-1695)
Music for a while Z583
A Fool’s Preferment Z571
– I’ll sail upon the dog star
– Sweeter than roses Z585

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)
Canticle II: Abraham and Isaac Op. 51

The first part was dominated by the Britten canticle, for which DD benefitted from help from tenor buddy David Webb. Their voices matched very well and they got into character enough to give the piece expressivity so that anyone could tell who was Abraham and who was Isaac. I liked it -> I should listen to more Britten.

INTERVAL

George Frideric Handel (1685-1759)
Rodelinda HWV19
– Pompe vane di morte!… Dove sei, amato bene?
– Si, l’infida consorte… Confusa si miri

Traditional
Ten Thousand Miles Away (arr. Steven Mark Kohn)
On the other shore (arr. Marita Kohler)
Wanderin’ (arr. Marita Kohler)
The Farmer’s Curst Wife (arr. Marita Kohler)

After the interval we were on familiar territory, with DD giving us a bit of his well known Bertarido. DD is the type of coutertenor with a very smooth voice and a youthful, sensitive tone (by which I mean plaintive but not schmalzy), which fits soulful arias better than vicious ones.

But we (Baroque Bird and I) agreed that the most memorable part was the traditional bit, with The Farmer’s Curst Wife coming off a riot. So yes (from me) to coutertenors singing art song and, in this case, traditional song. I’m quite fond of traditional in general and I wish more opera singers included it in their song recitals.

Maybe you’re wondering what I mean by the sponge metaphor. Whilst listening I kept imagining a gently squeezed sponge, which refers to elasticity and to smoothness across the range as well as softness of tone. It’s true that he’s the old school kind of countertenor – neither as fast nor as interested in proving chest note prowess (I don’t think he ventured that way) as the current crop – but the kind of elegant wistful emotion he can produce is still endearing and unique, to my ears at least. Even in the Baroque repertoire it’s not all about athleticism.

And, yes, it’s the end of the month hence the pedal to the metal with a flurry of posts after days of languidity.
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About dehggial

opera lover with a predilection for Mozart and Baroque

Posted on March 31, 2017, in countertenors, live performances, wigmore hall and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Grinning at the thought of DD as now an old school CT. Die Zeit, die ist… etc. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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